Hot Slut Of The Day!

October 7, 2018 / Posted by:

The door stopper rock that turned out to be a rare meteorite worth $100,000!

Like many abuelitas, my abuelita loved shopping and would “shop” anywhere we went. If we went to the beach, she’d “shop” by browsing the “tchotchkes” (read: the pebbles and shells) on the “showroom floor” (read: the sand) and take whatever she wanted without paying. If we went to the park, she’d search for rocks or flowers she liked and would take them. If we went to McDonald’s, she didn’t leave without taking ketchup packets and a stack of napkins. I do wonder whatever happened to all of the rocks and pebbles my archeologist abuelita (archeabuelita?)  collected throughout the years, because maybe in there is some kind of gift from the universe that is worth MONAY!!! Like today’s HSOTD.

Mona Sirbescu, a geology professor at Central Michigan University, tells CNN that the most valuable meteorite specimen she’s ever touched was brought to her after a Michigan man, who wants to keep his name private (because DUH, he knows his relative are going to come a lookin’ for a handout), brought it to the university. The meteorite was given to the dude by the farmer whose farm he bought in Edmore, MI in 1988. The farmer said that the meteorite dropped from the sky one night and it made a “heck of a noise.”  The farmer also said that the meteorite cracked open and out stepped a universe-shattering stunning goddess whose powerful beauty could melt eyes. The goddess sashayed away from his farm and boarded a bus headed for Hollywood. That ageless godess is now known as Shauna Sand. True story.

The farmer was using the meteorite as a doorstopper. When the man asked about it, the farmer said he could have it if he bought the farm. The dude has since moved from that farm, but kept the meteorite and also used it as a doorstop. After hearing about his fellow citizens of Michigan finding and selling pieces of meteorites, he decided to find out how much his is worth.

The meteorite was tested by both CMU and the Smithsonian. It’s believed to be worth $100,000.

“I could tell right away that this was something special,” Sibescu said.

After testing, she determined it was a meteorite, made of of 88.5% iron and 11.5% nickel. This isn’t just any space rock, though. Weighing 22 pounds, it’s the sixth-largest recorded find in Michigan — and potentially worth $100,000, according to CMU.

The Smithsonian and a mineral museum in Maine are thinking of buying it. The dude will donate 10% of its sale to CMU for the further study of shit from the universe.

If you’re like me and fell asleep with eyes wide open during science class, then relive the memories by falling asleep with eyes wide open while watching this video about the meteorite.

Why do I have a feeling that now every university geology department is going to get swamped with messes bringing all kinds of rocks from kidney stones to crack rocks, thinking that shit could be worth something? I would take in the shield and gemstone from my She-Ra action figure, but I don’t need anyone to tell me those things are priceless intergalactic artifacts.

Pic: YouTube

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