Judd Apatow And Seth Rogen Are Pissed At A Film Critic For Name Checking Them In A Piece About The UCSB Shooter

May 27, 2014 / Posted by:

On Sunday, The Washington Post published an op-ed piece about the UCSB shootings from movie critic Anna Hornaday (Side note: Why oh why isn’t my last name Hornaday?!) where she put blame on Hollywood for giving young dudes a distorted view of real-life by showing college life as a non-stop, booze-fueled frat sex orgy (“Wait, it isn’t?” – every student at the University of Iowa) and by showing movies where the homely, fat dude always gets the hot chick. The entire video game industry just collectively said, “Phew! For once, no one’s blaming us.

Anna Hornaday (I still can’t get over her hot name. She sounds like the Austin Powers villainess of my dreams) brought up Neighbors as an example. Judd Apatow and Seth Rogen didn’t like that. Anna’s entire piece is here, but below is the part where she blames Judd Apatow for making movie after movie about a schlub getting the girl.

As Rodger bemoaned his life of “loneliness, rejection and unfulfilled desire” and arrogantly announced that he would now prove his own status as “the true alpha male,” he unwittingly expressed the toxic double helix of insecurity and entitlement that comprises Hollywood’s DNA. For generations, mass entertainment has been overwhelmingly controlled by white men, whose escapist fantasies so often revolve around vigilantism and sexual wish-fulfillment (often, if not always, featuring a steady through-line of casual misogyny). Rodger’s rampage may be a function of his own profound distress, but it also shows how a sexist movie monoculture can be toxic for women and men alike.

How many students watch outsized frat-boy fantasies like “Neighbors” and feel, as Rodger did, unjustly shut out of college life that should be full of “sex and fun and pleasure”? How many men, raised on a steady diet of Judd Apatow comedies in which the shlubby arrested adolescent always gets the girl, find that those happy endings constantly elude them and conclude, “It’s not fair”?

So since I grew up in the 80s and 90s, does that mean I should’ve went on a horrific killing spree after the boss I tricked into thinking I was a grown professional didn’t offer to get me into a top fashion school when my cover was blown at a hot backyard fashion show starring my high school friends? Makes sense.

Anna Hornaday went deeper:

Movies may not reflect reality, but they powerfully condition what we desire, expect and feel we deserve from it. The myths that movies have been selling us become even more palpable at a time when spectators become their own auteurs and stars on YouTube, Instagram and Vine. If our cinematic grammar is one of violence, sexual conquest and macho swagger — thanks to male studio executives who green-light projects according to their own pathetic predilections — no one should be surprised when those impulses take luridly literal form in the culture at large.

Anna’s piece really set fire to the hairs on Seth and Judd’s ass lips. They went off on Twitter and Seth started it.

Judd piped in and accused Anna of being an attention whore who used a tragedy to get everyone to pay attention to her.

Th UCSB shooter was a narcissistic, entitled psychopathic puddle of smegma who thought white was king, was obsessed with status, measured his worth by how many chicks he got, thought women were put on this Earth for his pleasure only and thought violence would make him powerful. Maybe Anna Hornaday has a point somewhere in there. Maybe Judd Apatow has a point. Maybe Seth Rogen has a point. The only thing I do know for sure is that I don’t really like reading a Seth Rogen tweet with the words “Justin Bieber is a piece of shit” not in it. He should’ve just randomly thrown that in there.

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