Red Hot Lawsuit

November 20, 2007 / Posted by:
 
The Red Hot Chili Peppers sued Showtime yesterday for naming one of their shows "Californication" without their permission.
 
The Chili Peppers claim they coined the phrase by using it on their 1999 album. Anthony Kiedis said, "Californication is the signature CD, video and song of the band's career, and for some TV show to come along and steal our identity is not right."
 
The show stars David Duchovny as a writer who likes to have sex with strangers. Yeah, that's basically the plot. I've seen two episodes. The show also features a character named Dani California which is also the name of a Chili Peppers song.
 
The Chili Peppers want damages and restitution and disgorgement of all profits derived by the defendants. They also want to ban Showtime or anybody else from further using the name. 
 
The show's producer said he got the title from an old saying. "Apparently in the '70s there were bumper stickers that said 'Don't Californicate Oregon,' because Californians were coming up there, and I just thought it was a great, great title for this show."
 
For some reason I thought Showtime already got permission. All these stupid lawsuits. If they coined the phrase, give them the money. If they didn't, don't. That wasn't so hard. I doubt they coined the phrase. They probably got it from some stoner in Santa Monica. It sounds like something a stoner would come up with.
 
Kiedis could use the money anyway. Judging by his wardrobe choices he's hurting in the wallet.  
 
Source: Associated Press
 
 
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